Articles

“As Bowie maintained his distance from the public, the parallels with his time in Berlin were strikingly apparent. The artist was perhaps again trying to regain his health and recharge his creativity away from the excesses of fame.” — Entertainment Scene 360 (March 9, 2014)

Bowie’s ongoing silence recalls his period of healing and creativity in Berlin

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“[Y]ou put stress on yourself cause you know he’s David Bowie, but in every other respect of working with someone, he’s one of the better people cause he’s very generous with his praise, and when he doesn’t like something he’s quite clear about why; he’s very aware of his fan base as well, what would they appreciate or not.” — Rebel Rebel The Unconventional Music Magazine (January 10, 2014)

A Conversation With Jonathan Barnbrook On Working With David Bowie

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“Forty-four years since his first hit, rock’s greatest chameleon has transformed into his most surprising character yet: a dude in a fedora and white sneakers who looks vaguely like your uncle. But because he’s David Bowie, he’s still suaver than everyone.” — Huffington Post Canada (June 25, 2013)

Why Is David Bowie Wearing Your Dad’s Clothes?

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“Adopting the voice of David Bowie, Gervais continues: “Yeah, the artist, what he’s trying to do there is do the 3-D representation of Picasso’s 2-D representation of 3-D. My daughter likes to hit it with a hammer.” I love people like that, because they’re sort of aware of who they are.” — NME (May 31, 2013)

Ricky Gervais on his friendship with David Bowie: ‘We talk about music and comedy’

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“The new video for ‘The Next Day’ has landed and it’s just what you’d expect: batshit, beautiful and controversial.” — NME (May 8, 2013)

5 Startling Scenes from David Bowie’s ‘The Next Day’ Video

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“And anyway, the vanished-for-ten-years thing is a little bit overstating the case, because I believe Bowie last appeared on stage in 2006, so that’s more like seven years (or the same amount, roughly speaking, between appearances by Fiona Apple), and the guy had angioplasty, and probably thought he was going to die, and may well have had a reasonable expectation of dying, that is, he collapsed onstage according to some accounts, had to leave the stage, and he probably really doesn’t want to get back on a stage, and who can blame him, and anyway the whole issuing-bonds-on-future-earnings part of the Bowie story means that Bowie is relatively secure and didn’t need to make an album, he doesn’t have alimony to pay to a brace of ex-wives, and so why did he have to make an album at all, he didn’t have to make an album, there’s nothing to prove; as the Isolar press office has indicated, his feeling is that he doesn’t want to make an album these days, unless he has something to say, and, apparently, now he has something to say.” — The Rumpus (April 25, 2013)

Swinging Modern Sounds 44: And Another Day

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“[I]nner space that has always primarily moved Bowie, and as much as “The Next Day” is a great listen, what we’re really looking forward to is Bowie’s day after the next.” — The Jewish Daily Forward (April 16, 2013)

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“What a difference a vacuum makes. In the ten years he has been away – recovering from heart attacks, lying low in Manhattan and Woodstock and, according to every gossip columnist/journalist/“friend”/Bowie expert /jealous contemporary from Brixton to Beijing, dying of everything from leukaemia to emphysema – the cult of Dave has grown and grown, while his silence has almost become a piece of performance art in itself. Harvey Goldsmith says that Bowie is the only artist he has ever worked with who has an internal alarm clock – “His timing is perfect, and he knows exactly when to go, exactly when to stop” – and his decision to launch The Next Day, his first album for a decade, on the back of the V&A show is exactly that, a decision.” — New Statesman (April 9, 2013)

Starman Returns: The Perfect Re-Emergence Of David Bowie

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“I don’t know what he does. I think he was painting and was organising his closets.” — Irish Examiner (April 1, 2013)

Bowie’s Irish Bandmate Hopes Star Will Tour Again

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““Just turn on with me and you’re not alone…” That lyric, from “Rock ‘n’ Roll Suicide,” might be as close to a manifesto as David Bowie has ever uttered. Indeed, for all the revolutionary tunes and culture-crossing costumes, perhaps his greatest legacy is that he made it okay to be different. Very different.” — Black Book (March 25, 2013)

Mick Rock and Earl Slick on the New “David Bowie Is” Exhibition at London’s V&A

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“One astonishing 1969 promotional video on display at the V&A, entitled The Mask, depicts Bowie in pale face paint and a white, skin-tight leotard. He performs the story of the mask that becomes the face – a parable of deep symbolic significance to an artist who spent a career chan-neling characters of his own devising. His performance is unsettlingly precise, each movement so elegantly measured that, watching it, you feel as if he probably should have been a mime all along. Perhaps the voice, that wonderful raspy rock tenor, was not the key to his genius after all.” — Globe and Mail (March 23, 2013)

This David Bowie blockbuster has everything – except the elusive Mr. Bowie

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“Here I am praying at the altar, the eagerly awaited launch of his very own exhibition at the V&A museum. My heart throbs, my eyes goggle. I’m falling in love all over again.” — Morning Star (March 22, 2013)

David Bowie Is

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“”We can’t all be David Bowie, but he inspires us to dress and express our sexuality however we want — and this is still a challenging endeavour in many societies.” — Refinery 29 (March 22, 2013)

Insane Bowie Snaps, Infinite Behind-the-Scenes Intel

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“Therefore David Bowie Is… is a magnificent summation of wondering whether there is a world bigger than Finchley (replace with whatever small town you want), feeling like you don’t fit in and then subsequently rejecting the socially accepted norm, can take you.  That’s a sentiment I and any other non-Bowie fan can definitely get onboard with.” — Style Bubble (March 21, 2013)

Style Bubble: David Bowie Is…

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“No one believes us, but we had absolutely no idea about the album.” — The New York Times (March 19, 2013)

Record Ticket Sales For Bowie Exhibition In London

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“As Victoria Broackes points out, many of these items appear to attain the status of “holy relics”, a notable example being a piece of tissue blotted with Bowie’s lipstick from 1974 (glam rock’s very own Turin Shroud). On more than one display cabinet I see a Post-It note reading “Needs An Alarm”, and think to myself: “Damn right, it does.”” — The Quietus (March 19, 2013)

David Bowie Is – The First Review

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“David Bowie achieved both his first U.K. No. 1 album for 20 years and the market’s fastest-selling artist album of 2013 as “The Next Day” debuted at the top yesterday (Sunday).” — Billboard (March 18, 2013)

David Bowie Lands First U.K. No. 1 Album In 20 Years

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“The V&A exhibition feels full of love. Its exhibits are displayed with great verve and a kind of passion, as if everyone involved didn’t want to let their elusive subject down.” — The Telegraph (March 18, 2013)

David Bowie: The Show Goes On At The V&A

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“An Album of the Year Grammy award for David Bowie is long overdue. I look forward to the ceremony, and I look forward to him not showing up.” — National Review (March 16, 2013)

Throwing Shadows: David Bowie’s Protean Career Culminates With The Next Day

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“Everything about him seemed unusual.” — Elle UK (March 16, 2013)

The Day I Met David Bowie

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“His irreverence comes from a place of reverence—for music, for mystery, for one’s inner life, that unknowable territory that can only be mapped with the inexact brushstrokes of art. Like us, Bowie is of the world where clocks tick and the body grows sicker, but his art has made it possible for him to lay claim to “the next day, and the next, and another day.”” — The Atlantic (March 12, 2013)

The Predictably Unpredictable Resurrection of David Bowie

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“Though the most important item on David Bowie’s résumé is “solo musician, 1969-present,” he’s also loaned his skills to a remarkable number of other projects, from movies to TV shows to other people’s songs.” — The A.V. Club (March 11, 2013)

The Slinky Vagabond: 15 Notable David Bowie Cameos

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“When David Bowie’s pal John Lennon ended his reclusive five-year hiatus from the music business in 1980, it was with joyful celebrations of domesticity. Here’s what Bowie comes back with, after 10 years out of the public eye: “I can see you as a corpse/ Hanging from a beam,” and “Here am I/ Not quite dying/ My body left to rot on a hollow tree.”” — Montreal Gazette (March 10, 2013)

New Music Review: The Next Day, David Bowie

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“Having read Burroughs’ cut-up novel Nova Express to prepare for the interview, Bowie applied the technique to the words and sound of his next album, the darkly dystopian Diamond Dogs – a fusion of Burroughs and George Orwell. The cut-up, as he admitted later, perfectly suited his own fragmented consciousness, and also enabled him to cut through the tangle of expectation and image that threatened to slow him down. It sped everything up.” — The Guardian (March 9, 2013)

When Bowie Met Burroughs

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“In general, I find the structure of The Next Day significant, because it plays like a collection of discreet singles — songs each in a different style, genre, mood — very much in the current mode of consuming music, downloading one hit (or potential hit) at a time. Yet the music also coheres as an album in the classic-rock sense: a unified statement that can be listened to at full length, to tell a story about one man’s progression through innocence, experience, arrogance, cynicism, doubt, redemption and inspiration. Yes, that’s overstating it a bit, but not much. Yes, some of these steps falter in melody, or in sustaining the desired effect. But in general, The Next Day is a thriller, not merely a return to form — partly because David Bowie never took one form to begin with. This is his now-continuing contribution to pop music: the notion that restlessness and melancholy can yield more pleasure than anyone might reasonably expect.” — NPR.org (March 7, 2013)

David Bowie Awakens To ‘The Next Day’ Of His Career

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“Given David Bowie’s reputation as rock’s most cunning master of disguise, we should probably have twigged that the comeback single he released with no advance warning on his 66th birthday in January would turn out to be a red herring.” — Daily Mail (February 28, 2013)

David Bowie’s Back And He’s Glad To Be Glam… Singer Makes Loud And Triumphant Return With New Album

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“You don’t come to Bowie for easy answers, and The Next Day is both immediately rewarding and mystifyingly opaque. It closes on the ominous, despairing, jazzily introspective Heat, with the tremulous refrain “And I tell myself, I don’t know who I am.”” — The Telegraph (February 25, 2013)

David Bowie, The Next Day, Album Review

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“The result is an album that conveys, with apt anxiety or disgust, the fears and troubles of a world riven by conflict and distracted by superficial celebrity.” — The Independent (February 25, 2013)

David Bowie Album Review – Track By Track: The Starman Pulls Off The Greatest Comeback Album In Rock ‘n Roll History With The Next Day

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“Listening to The Next Day makes you hope it’s not a one-off, that his return continues apace: no mean feat, given that listening to a new album by most of his peers makes you wish they’d stick to playing the greatest hits.” — The Guardian (February 25, 2013)

David Bowie: The Next Day — Review

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“When I heard Where Are We Now? I cried. It was a mixture of happiness that it was being released, that it sounded gorgeous, and hearing this vulnerability in a person that I know and think of as almost superhuman.” — The Guardian (February 23, 2013)

David Bowie And Me

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“We’re getting called back for a second and third encore, and after that David goes, “Let’s do the Low record.” We were like, “Sure!” The audience just freaked out. Can you imagine it’s the third encore and he just comes on and said, “We’re gonna play Low?” It was totally spontaneous, but we had it in our back pocket by that point.” — Rolling Stone (February 20, 2013)

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“Tin Machine. There, we said it.” — The List (February 20, 2013)

The Best David Bowie Tracks You’ve Never Heard

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“A lot of people think they’re cutting edge, but Bowie genuinely broke down boundaries.” — Daily Mail (February 17, 2013)

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“David Bowie is an absolute creative genius and he deserves to be celebrated.” — Yahoo! Lifestyle (February 16, 2013)

Stephen Jones On Making Hats For David Bowie And Mentoring Milliners

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“This year, 2013, is shaping up to be the year of David Bowie, and now is the perfect moment for this feature length film devoted to this extraordinary artist.” — The Independent (February 14, 2013)

Previously Unseen David Bowie Footage To Be Aired For The First Time

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“[O]ur last exhibit in the exhibition is a piece we commissioned to try and show all the creative connections between Bowie and the people he’s influenced and been influenced by. It’s arranged like a periodic table of elements where the different letters are initials of different people — from Tristan Tzara to Lady Gaga. It’s called the Periodic Table of Bowie.” (Los Angeles Times, February 10, 2013)

David Bowie: His Glam Still Rocks

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“The future of the arts has been here for a while, but I suspect it required the return of an old hand at the occult mechanics of marketing like David Bowie to drive it home for a lot of people.” – Vice.com (February 4, 2013)

My Bloody Valentine, Bowie, and the URL of Things to Come

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“In this day and age, people are so distracted that it’s hard to show them anything they’ll pay attention to. By actually giving them nothing, they want to know more.” – Rolling Stone (February 1, 2013)

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“You could fit three Micks in Mick’s shirt. It’s that spacious.” – Grantland (January 25, 2013)

Rembert Explains the ’80s: David Bowie and Mick Jagger, ‘Dancing in the Street’
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“I’ve worked with a ton of people, and he’s always the easiest.” – Rolling Stone (January 25, 2013)

Q&A:David Bowie Guitarist Earl Slick on Secret New Album Sessions

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“…[b]ut rather than painting a self-aggrandizing self-portrait, Bowie uses the song to tell a “God awful small affair” of a young girl whose reality is so tormented that she seeks out the empty heroes of the movies to find some sort of salvation.” – American Songwriter (January 21, 2013)

David Bowie, “Life On Mars?”

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“Both Bowie and Eno are exceptionally sharp creative minds that read the zeitgeist… Things happen around them that defeat rationality.” – SPIN (January 18, 2013)

About That Time David Bowie’s New Album Was Foretold In A Dream…

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“Now there’s a new album to look forward to and with it the certain realisation never again should we take this most special of artists for granted.” – Liverpool Daily Post (January 17, 2013)

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“All these rumors started going around about his health. Every time I had lunch with him, or coffee with him, I’m looking at him and my dear old friend was looking really good.  But music didn’t interest him until two years ago; that’s when he made the call.” – Rolling Stone (January 15, 2013)

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“Bowie’s transition to a ‘recluse’ stands as what may be his last great transformation. Piecing new album The Next Day together in secret, boshing out single ‘Where Are We Now?’ without warning, refusing all interviews and letting the internet do the rest has clearly reaped far greater dividends than trudging around the global chat show circuit ever would.” – Drowned In Sound (January 14, 2013)

Where Was He Then? David Bowie’s Not-So ‘Lost’ Decade

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“At 66, Bowie also defies creative gravity. Most poets and songwriters do their best work before the age of 40…Bowie’s comeback, after a ten year silence in which some said he was dying, is both rare and remarkable.” – The Guardian (January 14, 2013)

David Bowie’s Exceptional Late Style

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“Bowie’s voice [is] gorgeously fragile – not the fragility of someone nearing 70 who’s lost their vocal power, but the fragility of someone who wants to communicate an aching wistfulness.” – The Guardian (January 13, 2013)

David Bowie Secures First Top 10 Single In 20 Years

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“Of course it might all mean nothing. Bowie often favoured writing lyrics by just stringing together random phrases and words. But that’s part of the beauty. He’s not explaining anything. He just dropped it out there and said, “Hello. I’m still here. Where are we now?” Ha ha.” – The Independent (January 13, 2013)

Bowie Is Back, And In The Coolest Of All Possible Moves

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“We live in an age when… artists are supposed to be in a constant dialogue with their fans, via Twitter or blogs or Facebook. It’s a timely reminder that mystique is a valuable commodity. You can perhaps give people more by giving them less.” – The Guardian (January 13, 2013)

The Inside Story Of How David Bowie Made The Next Day

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“As the world rejoiced at the return of David Bowie last week, the man himself chose to spend his 66th birthday at The Cloisters museum and gardens in New York. Wandering around the medieval treasures in northern Manhattan, it was a typical move for someone with nothing left to prove who wanted to let his lyrics and video speak for him.” – The Independent (January 13, 2013)

Tony Oursler: David Bowie’s Latest Work Is Astounding. There’s A Level Of Detail And Variety In It With The Highest Level Of Production

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“Congratulations. You’re a qualified fan and fully entitled to bore on about Bowie.” – The Guardian (January 12, 2013) after I scored 8/10 on the fan quiz.

David Bowie: How Big A Fan Are You? Take Our Quiz To Find Out

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“Although many imagine that the Wall simply ran through the middle of Berlin, it encircled the whole of West Berlin and extended for nearly 90 miles. Westerners adorned it with colourful graffiti; East Berliners attempting to get that close tended to be shot.” – The Telegraph (January 12, 2013) about the landmarks of Bowie’s Berlin and how they have changed.

David Bowie’s Berlin

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“The croaking, quavering baritone suggests someone who has seen all he needs to. “Just walking the dead,” he repeats throughout the song, as if that’s all there is to do.” – Salon (January 12, 2013)

Time Has Changed David Bowie: He Can Trace Time

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“This is class, in an age when class has acquired a bad name.” – The Quietus (January 11, 2013)

David Bowie: The Return Of The Thin White Hope

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“Bowie is back! And suddenly the music of most everyone else feels dull and lifeless by comparison.” – What Culture (January 10, 2013)

10 Forgotten David Bowie Gems

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It’s somehow very, very depressing,” she says. “I have the feeling he’s not doing well right now and is perhaps a bit melancholy and thinking back on what Berlin was to him.” – Spiegel Online (January 10, 2013) about Where Are We Now? and its reminiscences of Berlin.

Back In Berlin, At Least In Spirit

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